Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Bersa Thunder .380 Jamming

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5

    Bersa Thunder .380 Jamming

    Hello,
    I'm a new owner of a Bersa Thunder .380. I've put a 100 rounds through this gun and its jamming on a constant basis. It jams while loading into the barrel. I've tried different mags and the samething happens. When you pull the slide back as it pushes the round into the barrel it is getting caught on the lower part or the barrel, and won't slide into the chamber. If you look at the round after removing the mag and looking at the round, you can see a catch mark on the bullet where it getting caught. No matter how many times you pull back the slide the round is caught between the mag and the lower part of the barrel. I can get 2 or 3 rounds to fire then 2 or 3 will jam in a row. Very frustrating. Has anyone else had this happen? What can be done to fix it? If any.

    thank you

  2. #2
    Hello, timdske and welcome.
    I'm sorry that you're having troubles. You should only need to pull the slide back one time per magazine. This is to get the first round into the chamber. The process of feeding the rounds into the chamber should be automatic once the first round has been chambered, so I will assume that you are referring to clearing the jam when you state "no matter how many times you pull back the slide"? When the round jams, try dropping the magazine, pulling the slide back and letting the round fall out of the magazine well.

    As to why it's jamming in the first place, is the pistol new? and if so, did you give it a thorough cleaning and lube? New pistols are coated in shipping preservative, which can become quite tacky when heated and cause problems. The pistol should be cleaned thoroughly and lightly lubed. Pay special attention to the orientation of the recoil spring when putting the pistol back together. The smaller end of the spring goes to the breech end (the end that is closest to the grip) of the barrel. If the spring is placed backward, the pistol may have feeding issues. Use a good quality, round nosed FMJ ammo. Aluminum casings are okay, brass is preferred, and no steel.

    Make sure that your wrists are locked when shooting the pistol. The Thunder .380s are of blowback design. They rely on the force of the pressure leaving the chamber to push the slide all of the way back, then the recoil spring makes the slide come forward to chamber the next round. The path from the magazine to the chamber is almost straight, so that this can easily occur. The slide must be allowed to travel all the way backward or it cannot properly strip the round from the magazine and feed it into the chamber. Sometimes, the muzzle is allowed to flip up when the pistol is fired. The natural reaction of the shooter is to pull it back down. This up and down travel of the muzzle is called "limp wristing", and it can cause feeding issues. The recommendations to eliminate limp wristing as the cause are to a.) shoot the pistol from a rest or b.) have someone else give the pistol a try (preferably someone with shooting experience) and see if the symptoms follow the pistol.

    Good luck to you. I hope this helps.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Americangirl01 View Post
    Hello, timdske and welcome.
    I'm sorry that you're having troubles. You should only need to pull the slide back one time per magazine. This is to get the first round into the chamber. The process of feeding the rounds into the chamber should be automatic once the first round has been chambered, so I will assume that you are referring to clearing the jam when you state "no matter how many times you pull back the slide"? When the round jams, try dropping the magazine, pulling the slide back and letting the round fall out of the magazine well.

    As to why it's jamming in the first place, is the pistol new? and if so, did you give it a thorough cleaning and lube? New pistols are coated in shipping preservative, which can become quite tacky when heated and cause problems. The pistol should be cleaned thoroughly and lightly lubed. Pay special attention to the orientation of the recoil spring when putting the pistol back together. The smaller end of the spring goes to the breech end (the end that is closest to the grip) of the barrel. If the spring is placed backward, the pistol may have feeding issues. Use a good quality, round nosed FMJ ammo. Aluminum casings are okay, brass is preferred, and no steel.

    Make sure that your wrists are locked when shooting the pistol. The Thunder .380s are of blowback design. They rely on the force of the pressure leaving the chamber to push the slide all of the way back, then the recoil spring makes the slide come forward to chamber the next round. The path from the magazine to the chamber is almost straight, so that this can easily occur. The slide must be allowed to travel all the way backward or it cannot properly strip the round from the magazine and feed it into the chamber. Sometimes, the muzzle is allowed to flip up when the pistol is fired. The natural reaction of the shooter is to pull it back down. This up and down travel of the muzzle is called "limp wristing", and it can cause feeding issues. The recommendations to eliminate limp wristing as the cause are to a.) shoot the pistol from a rest or b.) have someone else give the pistol a try (preferably someone with shooting experience) and see if the symptoms follow the pistol.

    Good luck to you. I hope this helps.
    Yes, It is a new pistol. I cleaned it very well. The problem is the base of the barrel is very sharp and is catching and cutting the bullet. You can see the mark where its cutting into it. The problem isn't limp wristed shooting. I have other semi-auto's that have never jamed. I don't know if its a defective gun or what. I've put thousands of rounds through my .40 cal and 9mm and never had this happen.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by timdske View Post
    Yes, It is a new pistol. I cleaned it very well. The problem is the base of the barrel is very sharp and is catching and cutting the bullet. You can see the mark where its cutting into it. The problem isn't limp wristed shooting. I have other semi-auto's that have never jamed. I don't know if its a defective gun or what. I've put thousands of rounds through my .40 cal and 9mm and never had this happen.
    If you truly believe that the pistol is defective, a warranty center should be able to take care of it for you. You will want to be sure to include your magazines when shipping the pistol.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5
    I took the gun back to where I bought it, they took one look and told me their sending it back to Bersa. I showed them the gouges on the bullet when it was jamming going into the chamber. It looks like the barrel is slightly up and off center. Manufacturing defect. Of course of all the Bersa Thunders they sell I have to get the lemon. lol. So in about a month I should have it back. Bummer. But at least its going to be fixed for free.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by timdske View Post
    I took the gun back to where I bought it, they took one look and told me their sending it back to Bersa. I showed them the gouges on the bullet when it was jamming going into the chamber. It looks like the barrel is slightly up and off center. Manufacturing defect. Of course of all the Bersa Thunders they sell I have to get the lemon. lol. So in about a month I should have it back. Bummer. But at least its going to be fixed for free.
    Thanks for the update, timdske. I hope your pistol is returned to you in a timely fashion. Hopefully, we'll see a good range report before too long. Good luck to you and again, I'm sorry that you are having troubles.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    1
    My wife and I were at the shooting range last sunday and shot 125 rounds through the new bersa 380 cc we just bought and we were given a tip from the range officer to keep the arms locked before firing and this should keep the gun from jamming, our gun did this exactly what you are discribing so next time we go to the range we are going to pay more attention to our arms and see if this stops it from happening. He explained that if the arms are not locked it allows the gun to relax enough that it causes the slide not to slide as quickly and forcefully causing a jam.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5
    Finally got the .380 back yesterday. Only took 5 weeks. But what a difference. The barrel needed to be pushed bach and turned. It was off center. It looks great, the rounds are no longer jamming. Woo Hoo!!!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by timdske View Post
    Finally got the .380 back yesterday. Only took 5 weeks. But what a difference. The barrel needed to be pushed bach and turned. It was off center. It looks great, the rounds are no longer jamming. Woo Hoo!!!

    Good deal, timdske. Thank you for the update and I hope your new pistol serves you well.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Americangirl01 View Post
    Good deal, timdske. Thank you for the update and I hope your new pistol serves you well.
    It has now. I just put another 100 rounds through it yesterday, it was flawless. They really took care of it. Its very accurate.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •